The case of Niloufar Bayani

Monday 17 August 2020 - Words of Maisie Hopkins, edited by Etienne Seymour

PART ONE Niloufar Bayani is an Iranian researcher and conservationist who was arrested in January 2018 whilst conducting field research work in Iran as part of her role with the Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation (PWHF). In October 2018, Ms Bayani and three of her colleagues were indicted with the charge of ‘sowing corruption on earth’, […]

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The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation: Draconian or Necessary?

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation: Draconian or Necessary?

Wednesday 18 October 2017 - Aleksander Kalisz

Since 1999, the laws governing data protection at the European level have remained largely stagnant. The existing regime pertains mainly to data controllers – those who collect personal information. On the other hand, data processors – those who service information – are normally excluded from these regulations.[1] In addition, the current regime has glaring loopholes- […]

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The Refugee’s Struggle

The Refugee’s Struggle

Sunday 2 April 2017 - Thomas Ryan

When all eyes were on the new Prime Minister, Theresa May, during her first speech on the 13th July 2016, something very different was happening off the coast of Lesbos. Four dead bodies were being dragged from the sea after a dinghy that was carrying migrants had capsized off the east coast. A young girl […]

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Morals & Machines

Morals & Machines

Thursday 9 February 2017 - Waratchaya Limvipuwat

In 1984, director James Cameron introduced to the world, “The Terminator”. This was a film, set in a dystopian world where society is dominated by artificial intelligence networks. Back when the film was first released, the idea of machines and computers being able to revolt against man’s control was absurd. Today, it does not seem […]

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All Eyes on You – The Snooper’s Charter

All Eyes on You – The Snooper’s Charter

Thursday 9 February 2017 - Lauren Counsell

Was Orwell right? Are we now living in a real life 1984? Have we all just kissed goodbye to our privacy without knowing it? Unfortunately, the answer is possibly yes. Big Brother (or various government authorities) may soon be spying on you, if they are not already, or at least saving your personal data. The […]

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An Overview of the Refugee Panel Discussion

An Overview of the Refugee Panel Discussion

Thursday 9 February 2017 - Freya Cassia

It’s a familiar sight. Frightened refugees in overcrowded boats, desperately hoping for a better life in Europe. These images of sinking dinghies in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea should not be commonplace – but they are. In response to the refugee crisis, the UK government has pledged to resettle 20,000 refugees in the UK […]

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Crisis in the Mediterranean

Crisis in the Mediterranean

Thursday 9 February 2017 - Aisling Morgan

The magnitude of the migrant crisis faced by Europe appears to be unprecedented. With a flow of people coming into Spain from North West Africa, Italy from Libya and Tunisia, and particularly, into Greece from Turkey, it is undoubtedly at crisis point. Every week, news reports surface of yet another boat capsizing, leaving hundreds dead. […]

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Internet and Private Life – The Legal Challenge of Our Virtual Life

Internet and Private Life – The Legal Challenge of Our Virtual Life

Thursday 9 February 2017 - Rayan Kalfat

Three years after Snowden’s revelations about the NSA, mass surveillance is still doing pretty well. As a matter of fact, after France and Germany, the UK has now adopted a new law on intelligence that will result in the loss of privacy. The protection of private life has taken a new turn. The Internet changed […]

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British Bill of Rights: A Good Idea or a Political Proposition to Appease the ‘Right’?

British Bill of Rights: A Good Idea or a Political Proposition to Appease the ‘Right’?

Wednesday 1 June 2016 - Daniel Allison

The Conservative Government has taken it upon itself to introduce a Bill of Rights and repeal the current Human Rights Act introduced by the Labour Government. This is founded on the basis that the UK has lost its parliamentary sovereignty and the ECHR has developed a ‘mission creep’. The ECHR has arguably expanded into areas […]

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Modern Slavery Act: Wiping out Modern Slavery in UK businesses

Modern Slavery Act: Wiping out Modern Slavery in UK businesses

Saturday 14 November 2015 - Alice Gould

Modern Slavery Act: Wiping out Modern Slavery in UK businesses The Modern Slavery Act 2015 is the 21st Century Europe’s first piece of legislature to explicitly combat slavery and human trafficking. In October businesses with an annual turnover of £36 million or over will have a duty to publish a statement to demonstrate the steps […]

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Amicus-ALJ at the University of Nottingham

Amicus-ALJ at the University of Nottingham

Saturday 3 October 2015 - Alice Gould

Like most people (or at least what most people write in their UCAS applications), I was drawn to law by a desire to remedy social injustice. As I learnt more and more about human rights law through my university studies and various work placements, I realised that this area was the only possible route for […]

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Freedom from ill-treatment

Freedom from ill-treatment

Tuesday 3 February 2015 - Iga Wojtasik

This is the last in the series of articles on the work of the Mental Disability Advocacy Centre (MDAC), an international organisation based in Budapest, which fights for the human rights of people with mental disabilities. People with psycho-social and intellectual disabilities are especially vulnerable to abuse and neglect, and this article will attempt to […]

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“A Nation of Immigrants” – But For How Long?

“A Nation of Immigrants” – But For How Long?

Wednesday 26 November 2014 - Iga Wojtasik

On Thursday night, US President Barack Obama announced his new immigration policy. The decision has created an echo of controversy in the short time span since, especially from the Republican Party. The plan, which includes the decision to suspend the deportation of some unauthorised migrants, will protect millions of people from the threat of removal. It will […]

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A right to die: the legal perspective

A right to die: the legal perspective

Monday 24 November 2014 - Ee Hsien Tan

Per Lord Hope in R (on the application of Purdy) v DPP, ‘many people view legally assisted suicide as an appalling concept which undermines the fundamental human right to life itself. On the other hand there are those … who firmly believe that the right to life includes the right to end one’s own life […]

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When Faced with Tough Choices, Some Need Help

When Faced with Tough Choices, Some Need Help

Friday 21 November 2014 - Caroline Armstrong-Hall

This week features the second article in the series on challenges in securing human rights for persons with mental and psycho-social disabilities. The right to legal capacity is logically the next topic to visit because it forms the very basis for any person to make their own valid decisions about their mental health and treatment. […]

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A right to die: the moral perspective

A right to die: the moral perspective

Thursday 20 November 2014 - Ee Hsien Tan

It is perhaps highly ironic that with the advancement of medical science in areas of artificial life support and palliative care, issues regarding the appropriateness of terminating life have surfaced. Should it then be viewed as an egregious consideration that contradicts what is at the very heart of medical science: to prolong life and prevent […]

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‘Based on justice and equality’?

‘Based on justice and equality’?

Wednesday 19 November 2014 - Lian Selby

29th October 2014 marked the end of an arduous and emotional four-year battle for Gary Lim and Kenneth Chee, a couple in Singapore who have been together for 17 years. These brave individuals, joined by Tan Eng Hoon, a man arrested in 2010 for allegedly engaging in a homosexual act, spearheaded a historical campaign to […]

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Captain of capsized South Korean ferry faces death penalty

Captain of capsized South Korean ferry faces death penalty

Tuesday 18 November 2014 - Joey Lim

On the morning of the 16th of April, South Korea was struck by its worst ferry disaster since 1970. The MV Sewol was carrying 476 people, along with cargo worth approximately 200 billion Korean won, on its regular route from Incheon to Jeju. Most of the passengers were students from Danwon High School, enjoying a […]

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Life in the secret state of North Korea

Life in the secret state of North Korea

Thursday 13 November 2014 - Victoria Rowley

As one of the most secretive countries in the world, it is hard for an outsider to get a true picture of what life is like for the average North Korean. Coverage of the country’s affairs in international media predominantly focuses on the state’s nuclear ambitions, its frequent scuffles with its southern neighbours, and its […]

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Journalism, confidentiality and phone records: round two

Journalism, confidentiality and phone records: round two

Monday 10 November 2014 - Samuel Smith

Since the year-long Leveson Inquiry, many of us have been feeling fatigued by news stories featuring journalists, phone records and privacy issues. We have heard all the arguments on both sides. We have followed, or refused to follow, every twist of the Brooks-Murdock rollercoaster. You would be forgiven for reading this headline and rolling your […]

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Mental Disability Advocacy Centre: Securing Global Mental Health Human Rights Norms

Mental Disability Advocacy Centre: Securing Global Mental Health Human Rights Norms

Saturday 8 November 2014 - Caroline Armstrong-Hall and Iga Wojtasik

One in four Britons suffer from a mental health problem at some point in their life, according to a study published in The Economist. The impact of intellectual and psycho-social disabilities on society is felt in all countries across the world, and in a way that is more widespread and profound than many may realise. […]

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The Hong Kong Democracy Debate

The Hong Kong Democracy Debate

Monday 20 October 2014 - Marjorie Kong

As a city that enjoys considerable freedom, Hong Kong is no stranger to protests. However, the most recent protest in Hong Kong became a talking point across the world when the city’s police used unprecedented force to suppress protesters, leading to a furious escalation of events. The general message is clear: the crowd is fighting […]

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Delegation to the 27th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council 2014

Delegation to the 27th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council 2014

Tuesday 7 October 2014 - Jessica Allen

Delegations are unique experiences which offer students the opportunity to represent an association during conferences or council sessions organised by core international organisations. Those selected are invited to sit as delegates alongside both national delegates and representatives of renowned NGOs, and in attending, are given the chance to witness how decision and policy making works […]

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